News — indigenous

Textiles, the Book the Colonizers Couldn’t Burn

Textiles, the Book the Colonizers Couldn’t Burn

Textiles, often referred to as “the book the colonizers couldn’t burn”, come from the Maya weaving tradition that reaches back well before colonization. This matriarchal tradition, passed from mothers to daughters, has been compared to a silent resistance movement by women who were able to shield a major part of their cultural heritage by confining stories and symbols to the intricate weavings on their backstrap looms*. This art, and other facets of life related to fertility and the women’s role in Maya culture, was understood to be governed by the Maya goddess Ixchel (pronounced Ish-el) and...


Navigating the Murky Waters of Guatemalan “Fair Trade” Brands: A Guide

Navigating the Murky Waters of Guatemalan “Fair Trade” Brands: A Guide

"What happens when you learn to read between the lines of some [fair trade] labels and find their claims don’t stand up?"

As consumers, we are constantly faced with choices. But many of us are also busy. We don’t have time to investigate where every ingredient in a face cream comes from, or which coffee farms treat their workers fairly. We can’t all be experts on how long it takes to tool leather, or even where in the world certain countries are located. So especially as conscientious consumers, who care about where our money is...


8 Statistics you Need to Know on World Indigenous Peoples Day (And Every Day)

8 Statistics you Need to Know on World Indigenous Peoples Day (And Every Day)

August 9th is a day for the international community to rally behind the UN's Declaration of the rights of Indigenous Peoples. While every human being deserves dignity and equal treatment every day, let us today commit ourselves to better understanding the specific ways in which native peoples have been disproportionately affected by colonization and discrimination, in order to find ways both close to and far from home to get involved in ending the discrimination the world's indigenous peoples face on a daily basis.

Fact #1

There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people...

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